Effective, Real world, Race & Street Proven Parts & Accessories

If you are overwhelmed by all the numerous applications, benefits, specifications and preferences of so many oil choices, then this oil selection guide is for you! Just select your application or situation below and see what oils would work best for you and your particular situation.

ENGINE OIL

Hi Performance Street and Competition

DIFFERENTIAL (hi-speed car & light truck street, competition & all out racing)

Rear non-posi

Rear posi-traction (clutch style, most OEM)

Rear mechanical-posi (Detroit Lockers, etc)

Front 4wd non-posi

Front 4wd posi-traction (clutch style, most OEM)

Front mechanical-posi (Detroit Lockers, etc)

DIFFERENTIAL (heavy duty truck, towing, offroad, truck pulling, drag racing)

Rear non-posi

Rear posi-traction (clutch style, most OEM)

Rear mechanical-posi (Detroit Lockers, etc)

Front 4wd non-posi

Front 4wd posi-traction (clutch style, most OEM)

Front mechanical-posi (Detroit Lockers, etc)

MANUAL TRANSAXLE

Most with fibrous clutches in them

Fewer without fibrous clutches in them

MANUAL TRANSMISSION

Hi-Perf car/truck street-tow

Hi-Speed car street/competition

Heavy duty truck street, tow and off road

Motorcycle Trans. (non-engine oiled)

TRANSFER CASE /with-OUT fibrous clutches   (hi-speed car & street light truck)

Requiring either ATF or Gearoil type fluid

Requiring Gearoil fluid only

Requiring ATF automatic trans fluid only

TRANSFER CASE /with-OUT fibrous clutches   (heavy duty truck, towing and offroad)

Requiring either ATF or Gearoil type fluid

Requiring Gearoil fluid only

Requiring ATF automatic trans fluid only

TRANSFER CASE /With  fibrous clutches   (hi-speed car & street light truck)

Requiring either ATF or Gearoil type fluid

Requiring Gearoil fluid only

Requiring ATF automatic trans fluid only

TRANSFER CASE /With  fibrous clutches   (heavy duty truck, towing and offroad)

Requiring either ATF or Gearoil type fluid

Requiring Gearoil fluid only

Requiring ATF automatic trans fluid only

FASTENERS bolts, nuts, pins, etc

Anti-corrosion prevention & Anti-seize

WHEN SHOULD I CHANGE MY GEAR OIL?

"...In a nut shell, changing them annually keeps the lubricant at it's peak performance at all times, depending on usage levels and the expectations you need from your lubricant..."

However, our specially developed lubricants should significantly extend the required intervals between fluid changes due to the superior lubrication strength and engineered chemical stamina these oils contain, however, there are other factors determine the maintenance period between changes affected by external factors that may prematurely require more frequent oil changes.

WEAR: Firstly, imagine the microscopic particles making up the oil as being "strands" all bundled together. The specific size, shape and combination of these strands give a particular oil it's color, shape, viscosity and properties. Depending on the application and usage, these strands eventually can be "cut up" during the operation of a gear cluster environment. The constant gnashing and shearing of gears, bearings bushings and teeth accelerate this result. Some gear cases are more brutal in their design than others, thus some applications may need a fluid change more often than others.

ABUSE: Another significant factor affecting lubrication life expectations is the usage the fluid will be put into. A limousine type application will obviously see much less abuse than the lubricant in a dump truck application. Shock loading, torque loading and high speed rotation environments will wear out a fluid much sooner than other application. An application that sees a lot of gear changes such as in a dump truck or race car's manual transmission also affect the fluid's longevity as well.

HEAT: Heat is a primary factor in lubrication life, since if a fluid gets too hot it can burn a lot of it's beneficial lubrication and protection properties as well as created contaminants in the form of crust and sludge as a result of the overheating condition. A fluid operating too cold can also prematurely reduce it's life since it may not be able to reach it's self cleaning temperature where moisture and acids can evaporate or "boil off", thus slowly increasing it's self contamination levels.

CONTAMINANTS: Probably the single most common factor in premature oil replacement is contaminants. A primary contaminant is almost unavoidable in the form of metal particles resulting from normal and abnormal gear wear. While a good fluid can slow this process, it is more of a result from mechanical stress  and abuse as well as the initial design and machining of the mechanism that lubricty issues. A superior lubricant may slow or delay this process, but it will usually not stop the inevitable. Another common contributor to long term contamination is moisture and condensation. As a gearcase heats up and cools down, moisture accumulates on the inside of the case which eventually enters into the oil. If the gearcase is not brought up to 180+ degrees periodically, the moisture will not evaporate off and will dilute the lubricant after time. More frequent changes to remove the above contaminants are your best defense for enabling maximum lubrication protection of your components. In extreme contamination cases where significant amounts of water and dirt entered into the lubrication environment resulting from off roading, stream crossing, or sandy and dusty terrain, an immediate change of fluids will be required.